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Wood Cutting Blade

Pioneers in the industry, we offer 14 inch wood cutting blade, wood cutting aara blade, 12 inch wood cutting blade, wood cutting ripping blade, 28 inch wood cutting blade and 18 inch wood cutting blade from India.
  • 14 Inch Wood Cutting Blade
  • 14 Inch Wood Cutting Blade
  • 14 Inch Wood Cutting Blade
14 Inch Wood Cutting Blade

14 Inch Wood Cutting Blade

Rs 1,100  / PieceGet Best Price
MaterialMild Steel
ApplicationWood Cutting
UsageFor Ripping
Number of Teeth24
ShapeCircular

Wood cutting blades are specifically designed cutting tools used for various woodworking applications. These blades are used with different types of saws, such as circular saws, table saws, miter saws, or jigsaws, to cut through wood efficiently. Here is a description of wood cutting blades and their specifications:

  1. Blade Type: Wood cutting blades come in various types depending on the cutting application and the type of saw being used. Common types include rip-cut blades, crosscut blades, combination blades (for both ripping and crosscutting), dado blades (for making grooves), and specialty blades for specific woodworking tasks.

  2. Tooth Design: Wood cutting blades have teeth along the edge that perform the cutting action. The tooth design can vary based on the cutting task. Rip-cut blades typically have fewer teeth with a large gullet for efficient material removal when cutting with the grain. Crosscut blades have more teeth for cleaner cuts across the grain. Alternate top bevel (ATB) tooth configuration is commonly used for general-purpose wood cutting, while other specialized tooth designs may include flat top grind (FTG), triple-chip grind (TCG), or combination teeth.

  3. Blade Diameter: Wood cutting blades are available in different diameters, typically ranging from 4 to 12 inches (10.2 to 30.5 cm) or larger. The blade diameter determines the maximum cutting depth that can be achieved with the saw.

  4. Kerf: The kerf refers to the width of the slot or cut made by the blade. Wood cutting blades have different kerf sizes, which impact the amount of material wasted during the cutting process. Blades with a thinner kerf generate less waste but may have reduced durability.

  5. Hook Angle: The hook angle refers to the angle at which the teeth of the blade are tilted. Positive hook angles, such as 10 to 20 degrees, are commonly used for ripping applications, while negative or zero hook angles are suitable for crosscutting tasks. The hook angle affects the aggressiveness of the blade and the ease of feed during cutting.

  6. Carbide Tips: Many wood cutting blades feature carbide tips, which are durable and stay sharper for longer periods compared to regular steel blades. Carbide-tipped blades are particularly effective when cutting hardwoods or abrasive materials.

  7. Coating: Some wood cutting blades may feature specialized coatings, such as Teflon or similar non-stick coatings. These coatings reduce friction, improve cutting efficiency, and prevent material buildup on the blade.

  8. Arbor Size: Wood cutting blades have a central hole called the arbor hole, which fits onto the arbor (shaft) of the saw. The arbor size varies, typically ranging from 5/8 inch (15.9 mm) to 1 inch (25.4 mm). It is important to ensure that the blade's arbor size matches the arbor size of the saw for proper fit and safe operation.

  9. RPM (Revolutions Per Minute): Each wood cutting blade has a recommended maximum RPM specified by the manufacturer. It is crucial to ensure that the blade's RPM rating matches or exceeds the maximum RPM of the saw to prevent damage or accidents.

  10. Application: Wood cutting blades are used for a wide range of woodworking applications, including crosscutting, ripping, miter cuts, bevel cuts, and specialty tasks such as dado cutting or molding. They are used in various woodworking projects, including furniture making, cabinetry, carpentry, and general woodworking tasks.

It's important to note that specific wood cutting blades may have additional features or variations based on the manufacturer, blade type, and intended application. Always refer to the manufacturer's guidelines and recommendations for the specific blade you are using to ensure proper usage, safety, and optimal

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  • Wood Cutting Aara Blade
  • Wood Cutting Aara Blade
  • Wood Cutting Aara Blade
  • Wood Cutting Aara Blade
Wood Cutting Aara Blade

Wood Cutting Aara Blade

Rs 1,200  / PieceGet Best Price
ApplicationWood Cutting
MaterialMild Steel
UsageFor Ripping
ShapeCircular
TEETH100

A wood cutting ripping blade is a specialized tool designed for making rip cuts in wood. Rip cuts are straight cuts made parallel to the wood grain, typically used for cutting boards to width or ripping large panels. Here is a description of a wood cutting ripping blade and its specifications:

  1. Blade Type: Wood cutting ripping blades are typically circular saw blades designed specifically for ripping cuts. They have a specific tooth geometry and configuration optimized for efficient material removal during rip cuts.

  2. Tooth Design: Ripping blades have large, flat-top teeth with deep gullets between them. The flat-top teeth are typically arranged in a flat-top or alternate top bevel (ATB) configuration. This tooth design helps to efficiently remove wood chips and sawdust from the cut, reducing heat buildup and preventing blade binding.

  3. Tooth Count: Ripping blades usually have a low tooth count, typically ranging from 20 to 30 teeth. The low tooth count allows for faster material removal and reduces strain on the motor, making them suitable for ripping through thick wood stock.

  4. Hook Angle: Ripping blades have a positive hook angle, typically ranging from 10 to 20 degrees. The positive hook angle helps the blade to aggressively bite into the wood and facilitate smooth and efficient cutting.

  5. Blade Diameter: Wood cutting ripping blades come in different diameters, typically ranging from 7-1/4 inches (18.4 cm) to 10 inches (25.4 cm) or larger. The blade diameter determines the maximum cutting depth that can be achieved.

  6. Arbor Size: Ripping blades have a central hole called the arbor hole, which fits onto the arbor (shaft) of the circular saw or table saw. The arbor size varies, typically ranging from 5/8 inch (15.9 mm) to 1 inch (25.4 mm). It is important to ensure that the blade's arbor size matches the arbor size of the saw for proper fit and safe operation.

  7. Blade Coating: Some ripping blades may have a special coating, such as a non-stick coating or anti-friction coating. These coatings reduce friction and heat buildup during cutting, resulting in smoother cuts and longer blade life.

  8. Application: Wood cutting ripping blades are primarily used for making rip cuts in solid wood, plywood, and other wood materials. They are commonly used in woodworking projects, carpentry, cabinetry, and furniture making.

It's important to note that the specific features and specifications of wood cutting ripping blades can vary depending on the manufacturer, blade type, and intended application. It is recommended to consult the manufacturer's guidelines and recommendations for the specific blade you are using to ensure proper usage, safety, and optimal cutting performance for wood materials.

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  • 12 Inch Wood Cutting Blade
  • 12 Inch Wood Cutting Blade
  • 12 Inch Wood Cutting Blade
  • 12 Inch Wood Cutting Blade
12 Inch Wood Cutting Blade

12 Inch Wood Cutting Blade

Rs 800  / PieceGet Best Price
MaterialMild Steel
ApplicationWood Cutting
UsageFor Ripping
Number of Teeth32
ShapeCircular

Wood cutting blades are specifically designed cutting tools used for various woodworking applications. These blades are used with different types of saws, such as circular saws, table saws, miter saws, or jigsaws, to cut through wood efficiently. Here is a description of wood cutting blades and their specifications:

  1. Blade Type: Wood cutting blades come in various types depending on the cutting application and the type of saw being used. Common types include rip-cut blades, crosscut blades, combination blades (for both ripping and crosscutting), dado blades (for making grooves), and specialty blades for specific woodworking tasks.

  2. Tooth Design: Wood cutting blades have teeth along the edge that perform the cutting action. The tooth design can vary based on the cutting task. Rip-cut blades typically have fewer teeth with a large gullet for efficient material removal when cutting with the grain. Crosscut blades have more teeth for cleaner cuts across the grain. Alternate top bevel (ATB) tooth configuration is commonly used for general-purpose wood cutting, while other specialized tooth designs may include flat top grind (FTG), triple-chip grind (TCG), or combination teeth.

  3. Blade Diameter: Wood cutting blades are available in different diameters, typically ranging from 4 to 12 inches (10.2 to 30.5 cm) or larger. The blade diameter determines the maximum cutting depth that can be achieved with the saw.

  4. Kerf: The kerf refers to the width of the slot or cut made by the blade. Wood cutting blades have different kerf sizes, which impact the amount of material wasted during the cutting process. Blades with a thinner kerf generate less waste but may have reduced durability.

  5. Hook Angle: The hook angle refers to the angle at which the teeth of the blade are tilted. Positive hook angles, such as 10 to 20 degrees, are commonly used for ripping applications, while negative or zero hook angles are suitable for crosscutting tasks. The hook angle affects the aggressiveness of the blade and the ease of feed during cutting.

  6. Carbide Tips: Many wood cutting blades feature carbide tips, which are durable and stay sharper for longer periods compared to regular steel blades. Carbide-tipped blades are particularly effective when cutting hardwoods or abrasive materials.

  7. Coating: Some wood cutting blades may feature specialized coatings, such as Teflon or similar non-stick coatings. These coatings reduce friction, improve cutting efficiency, and prevent material buildup on the blade.

  8. Arbor Size: Wood cutting blades have a central hole called the arbor hole, which fits onto the arbor (shaft) of the saw. The arbor size varies, typically ranging from 5/8 inch (15.9 mm) to 1 inch (25.4 mm). It is important to ensure that the blade's arbor size matches the arbor size of the saw for proper fit and safe operation.

  9. RPM (Revolutions Per Minute): Each wood cutting blade has a recommended maximum RPM specified by the manufacturer. It is crucial to ensure that the blade's RPM rating matches or exceeds the maximum RPM of the saw to prevent damage or accidents.

  10. Application: Wood cutting blades are used for a wide range of woodworking applications, including crosscutting, ripping, miter cuts, bevel cuts, and specialty tasks such as dado cutting or molding. They are used in various woodworking projects, including furniture making, cabinetry, carpentry, and general woodworking tasks.

It's important to note that specific wood cutting blades may have additional features or variations based on the manufacturer, blade type, and intended application. Always refer to the manufacturer's guidelines and recommendations for the specific blade you are using to ensure proper usage, safety, and optimal

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  • Wood Cutting Ripping Blade
  • Wood Cutting Ripping Blade
  • Wood Cutting Ripping Blade
Wood Cutting Ripping Blade

Wood Cutting Ripping Blade

Rs 1,200  / PieceGet Best Price
MaterialMild Steel
ApplicationWood Cutting
UsageFor Cross Cutting
Number of Teeth32
ShapeCircular

A wood cutting ripping blade is a specialized tool designed for making rip cuts in wood. Rip cuts are straight cuts made parallel to the wood grain, typically used for cutting boards to width or ripping large panels. Here is a description of a wood cutting ripping blade and its specifications:

  1. Blade Type: Wood cutting ripping blades are typically circular saw blades designed specifically for ripping cuts. They have a specific tooth geometry and configuration optimized for efficient material removal during rip cuts.

  2. Tooth Design: Ripping blades have large, flat-top teeth with deep gullets between them. The flat-top teeth are typically arranged in a flat-top or alternate top bevel (ATB) configuration. This tooth design helps to efficiently remove wood chips and sawdust from the cut, reducing heat buildup and preventing blade binding.

  3. Tooth Count: Ripping blades usually have a low tooth count, typically ranging from 20 to 30 teeth. The low tooth count allows for faster material removal and reduces strain on the motor, making them suitable for ripping through thick wood stock.

  4. Hook Angle: Ripping blades have a positive hook angle, typically ranging from 10 to 20 degrees. The positive hook angle helps the blade to aggressively bite into the wood and facilitate smooth and efficient cutting.

  5. Blade Diameter: Wood cutting ripping blades come in different diameters, typically ranging from 7-1/4 inches (18.4 cm) to 10 inches (25.4 cm) or larger. The blade diameter determines the maximum cutting depth that can be achieved.

  6. Arbor Size: Ripping blades have a central hole called the arbor hole, which fits onto the arbor (shaft) of the circular saw or table saw. The arbor size varies, typically ranging from 5/8 inch (15.9 mm) to 1 inch (25.4 mm). It is important to ensure that the blade's arbor size matches the arbor size of the saw for proper fit and safe operation.

  7. Blade Coating: Some ripping blades may have a special coating, such as a non-stick coating or anti-friction coating. These coatings reduce friction and heat buildup during cutting, resulting in smoother cuts and longer blade life.

  8. Application: Wood cutting ripping blades are primarily used for making rip cuts in solid wood, plywood, and other wood materials. They are commonly used in woodworking projects, carpentry, cabinetry, and furniture making.

It's important to note that the specific features and specifications of wood cutting ripping blades can vary depending on the manufacturer, blade type, and intended application. It is recommended to consult the manufacturer's guidelines and recommendations for the specific blade you are using to ensure proper usage, safety, and optimal cutting performance for wood materials.

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  • 28 Inch Wood Cutting Blade
  • 28 Inch Wood Cutting Blade
  • 28 Inch Wood Cutting Blade
28 Inch Wood Cutting Blade

28 Inch Wood Cutting Blade

Rs 3,800  / PieceGet Best Price
Size (Diameter)10 Inch
MaterialMild Steel
ApplicationWood Cutting
UsageFor Cross Cutting
Number of Teeth32
ShapeCircular

Wood cutting blades are specifically designed cutting tools used for various woodworking applications. These blades are used with different types of saws, such as circular saws, table saws, miter saws, or jigsaws, to cut through wood efficiently. Here is a description of wood cutting blades and their specifications:

  1. Blade Type: Wood cutting blades come in various types depending on the cutting application and the type of saw being used. Common types include rip-cut blades, crosscut blades, combination blades (for both ripping and crosscutting), dado blades (for making grooves), and specialty blades for specific woodworking tasks.

  2. Tooth Design: Wood cutting blades have teeth along the edge that perform the cutting action. The tooth design can vary based on the cutting task. Rip-cut blades typically have fewer teeth with a large gullet for efficient material removal when cutting with the grain. Crosscut blades have more teeth for cleaner cuts across the grain. Alternate top bevel (ATB) tooth configuration is commonly used for general-purpose wood cutting, while other specialized tooth designs may include flat top grind (FTG), triple-chip grind (TCG), or combination teeth.

  3. Blade Diameter: Wood cutting blades are available in different diameters, typically ranging from 4 to 12 inches (10.2 to 30.5 cm) or larger. The blade diameter determines the maximum cutting depth that can be achieved with the saw.

  4. Kerf: The kerf refers to the width of the slot or cut made by the blade. Wood cutting blades have different kerf sizes, which impact the amount of material wasted during the cutting process. Blades with a thinner kerf generate less waste but may have reduced durability.

  5. Hook Angle: The hook angle refers to the angle at which the teeth of the blade are tilted. Positive hook angles, such as 10 to 20 degrees, are commonly used for ripping applications, while negative or zero hook angles are suitable for crosscutting tasks. The hook angle affects the aggressiveness of the blade and the ease of feed during cutting.

  6. Carbide Tips: Many wood cutting blades feature carbide tips, which are durable and stay sharper for longer periods compared to regular steel blades. Carbide-tipped blades are particularly effective when cutting hardwoods or abrasive materials.

  7. Coating: Some wood cutting blades may feature specialized coatings, such as Teflon or similar non-stick coatings. These coatings reduce friction, improve cutting efficiency, and prevent material buildup on the blade.

  8. Arbor Size: Wood cutting blades have a central hole called the arbor hole, which fits onto the arbor (shaft) of the saw. The arbor size varies, typically ranging from 5/8 inch (15.9 mm) to 1 inch (25.4 mm). It is important to ensure that the blade's arbor size matches the arbor size of the saw for proper fit and safe operation.

  9. RPM (Revolutions Per Minute): Each wood cutting blade has a recommended maximum RPM specified by the manufacturer. It is crucial to ensure that the blade's RPM rating matches or exceeds the maximum RPM of the saw to prevent damage or accidents.

  10. Application: Wood cutting blades are used for a wide range of woodworking applications, including crosscutting, ripping, miter cuts, bevel cuts, and specialty tasks such as dado cutting or molding. They are used in various woodworking projects, including furniture making, cabinetry, carpentry, and general woodworking tasks.

It's important to note that specific wood cutting blades may have additional features or variations based on the manufacturer, blade type, and intended application. Always refer to the manufacturer's guidelines and recommendations for the specific blade you are using to ensure proper usage, safety, and optimal

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  • 18 Inch Wood Cutting Blade
  • 18 Inch Wood Cutting Blade
  • 18 Inch Wood Cutting Blade
18 Inch Wood Cutting Blade

18 Inch Wood Cutting Blade

Rs 1,550  / PieceGet Best Price
MaterialMild Steel
ApplicationWood Cutting
UsageFor Ripping
Number of Teeth32
ShapeCircular

Wood cutting blades are specifically designed cutting tools used for various woodworking applications. These blades are used with different types of saws, such as circular saws, table saws, miter saws, or jigsaws, to cut through wood efficiently. Here is a description of wood cutting blades and their specifications:

  1. Blade Type: Wood cutting blades come in various types depending on the cutting application and the type of saw being used. Common types include rip-cut blades, crosscut blades, combination blades (for both ripping and crosscutting), dado blades (for making grooves), and specialty blades for specific woodworking tasks.

  2. Tooth Design: Wood cutting blades have teeth along the edge that perform the cutting action. The tooth design can vary based on the cutting task. Rip-cut blades typically have fewer teeth with a large gullet for efficient material removal when cutting with the grain. Crosscut blades have more teeth for cleaner cuts across the grain. Alternate top bevel (ATB) tooth configuration is commonly used for general-purpose wood cutting, while other specialized tooth designs may include flat top grind (FTG), triple-chip grind (TCG), or combination teeth.

  3. Blade Diameter: Wood cutting blades are available in different diameters, typically ranging from 4 to 12 inches (10.2 to 30.5 cm) or larger. The blade diameter determines the maximum cutting depth that can be achieved with the saw.

  4. Kerf: The kerf refers to the width of the slot or cut made by the blade. Wood cutting blades have different kerf sizes, which impact the amount of material wasted during the cutting process. Blades with a thinner kerf generate less waste but may have reduced durability.

  5. Hook Angle: The hook angle refers to the angle at which the teeth of the blade are tilted. Positive hook angles, such as 10 to 20 degrees, are commonly used for ripping applications, while negative or zero hook angles are suitable for crosscutting tasks. The hook angle affects the aggressiveness of the blade and the ease of feed during cutting.

  6. Carbide Tips: Many wood cutting blades feature carbide tips, which are durable and stay sharper for longer periods compared to regular steel blades. Carbide-tipped blades are particularly effective when cutting hardwoods or abrasive materials.

  7. Coating: Some wood cutting blades may feature specialized coatings, such as Teflon or similar non-stick coatings. These coatings reduce friction, improve cutting efficiency, and prevent material buildup on the blade.

  8. Arbor Size: Wood cutting blades have a central hole called the arbor hole, which fits onto the arbor (shaft) of the saw. The arbor size varies, typically ranging from 5/8 inch (15.9 mm) to 1 inch (25.4 mm). It is important to ensure that the blade's arbor size matches the arbor size of the saw for proper fit and safe operation.

  9. RPM (Revolutions Per Minute): Each wood cutting blade has a recommended maximum RPM specified by the manufacturer. It is crucial to ensure that the blade's RPM rating matches or exceeds the maximum RPM of the saw to prevent damage or accidents.

  10. Application: Wood cutting blades are used for a wide range of woodworking applications, including crosscutting, ripping, miter cuts, bevel cuts, and specialty tasks such as dado cutting or molding. They are used in various woodworking projects, including furniture making, cabinetry, carpentry, and general woodworking tasks.

It's important to note that specific wood cutting blades may have additional features or variations based on the manufacturer, blade type, and intended application. Always refer to the manufacturer's guidelines and recommendations for the specific blade you are using to ensure proper usage, safety, and optimal

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  • 16 Inch Wood Cutting Blade
  • 16 Inch Wood Cutting Blade
  • 16 Inch Wood Cutting Blade
16 Inch Wood Cutting Blade

16 Inch Wood Cutting Blade

Rs 1,400  / PieceGet Best Price
MaterialMild Steel
ApplicationWood Cutting
UsageFor Ripping
Number of Teeth32
ShapeCircular

Wood cutting blades are specifically designed cutting tools used for various woodworking applications. These blades are used with different types of saws, such as circular saws, table saws, miter saws, or jigsaws, to cut through wood efficiently. Here is a description of wood cutting blades and their specifications:

  1. Blade Type: Wood cutting blades come in various types depending on the cutting application and the type of saw being used. Common types include rip-cut blades, crosscut blades, combination blades (for both ripping and crosscutting), dado blades (for making grooves), and specialty blades for specific woodworking tasks.

  2. Tooth Design: Wood cutting blades have teeth along the edge that perform the cutting action. The tooth design can vary based on the cutting task. Rip-cut blades typically have fewer teeth with a large gullet for efficient material removal when cutting with the grain. Crosscut blades have more teeth for cleaner cuts across the grain. Alternate top bevel (ATB) tooth configuration is commonly used for general-purpose wood cutting, while other specialized tooth designs may include flat top grind (FTG), triple-chip grind (TCG), or combination teeth.

  3. Blade Diameter: Wood cutting blades are available in different diameters, typically ranging from 4 to 12 inches (10.2 to 30.5 cm) or larger. The blade diameter determines the maximum cutting depth that can be achieved with the saw.

  4. Kerf: The kerf refers to the width of the slot or cut made by the blade. Wood cutting blades have different kerf sizes, which impact the amount of material wasted during the cutting process. Blades with a thinner kerf generate less waste but may have reduced durability.

  5. Hook Angle: The hook angle refers to the angle at which the teeth of the blade are tilted. Positive hook angles, such as 10 to 20 degrees, are commonly used for ripping applications, while negative or zero hook angles are suitable for crosscutting tasks. The hook angle affects the aggressiveness of the blade and the ease of feed during cutting.

  6. Carbide Tips: Many wood cutting blades feature carbide tips, which are durable and stay sharper for longer periods compared to regular steel blades. Carbide-tipped blades are particularly effective when cutting hardwoods or abrasive materials.

  7. Coating: Some wood cutting blades may feature specialized coatings, such as Teflon or similar non-stick coatings. These coatings reduce friction, improve cutting efficiency, and prevent material buildup on the blade.

  8. Arbor Size: Wood cutting blades have a central hole called the arbor hole, which fits onto the arbor (shaft) of the saw. The arbor size varies, typically ranging from 5/8 inch (15.9 mm) to 1 inch (25.4 mm). It is important to ensure that the blade's arbor size matches the arbor size of the saw for proper fit and safe operation.

  9. RPM (Revolutions Per Minute): Each wood cutting blade has a recommended maximum RPM specified by the manufacturer. It is crucial to ensure that the blade's RPM rating matches or exceeds the maximum RPM of the saw to prevent damage or accidents.

  10. Application: Wood cutting blades are used for a wide range of woodworking applications, including crosscutting, ripping, miter cuts, bevel cuts, and specialty tasks such as dado cutting or molding. They are used in various woodworking projects, including furniture making, cabinetry, carpentry, and general woodworking tasks.

It's important to note that specific wood cutting blades may have additional features or variations based on the manufacturer, blade type, and intended application. Always refer to the manufacturer's guidelines and recommendations for the specific blade you are using to ensure proper usage, safety, and optimal

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  • 20 Inch Wood Cutting Blade
  • 20 Inch Wood Cutting Blade
  • 20 Inch Wood Cutting Blade
20 Inch Wood Cutting Blade

20 Inch Wood Cutting Blade

Rs 1,900  / PieceGet Best Price
ApplicationWood Cutting
MaterialMild Steel
UsageFor Ripping
Number of Teeth32
ShapeCircular

Wood cutting blades are specifically designed cutting tools used for various woodworking applications. These blades are used with different types of saws, such as circular saws, table saws, miter saws, or jigsaws, to cut through wood efficiently. Here is a description of wood cutting blades and their specifications:

  1. Blade Type: Wood cutting blades come in various types depending on the cutting application and the type of saw being used. Common types include rip-cut blades, crosscut blades, combination blades (for both ripping and crosscutting), dado blades (for making grooves), and specialty blades for specific woodworking tasks.

  2. Tooth Design: Wood cutting blades have teeth along the edge that perform the cutting action. The tooth design can vary based on the cutting task. Rip-cut blades typically have fewer teeth with a large gullet for efficient material removal when cutting with the grain. Crosscut blades have more teeth for cleaner cuts across the grain. Alternate top bevel (ATB) tooth configuration is commonly used for general-purpose wood cutting, while other specialized tooth designs may include flat top grind (FTG), triple-chip grind (TCG), or combination teeth.

  3. Blade Diameter: Wood cutting blades are available in different diameters, typically ranging from 4 to 12 inches (10.2 to 30.5 cm) or larger. The blade diameter determines the maximum cutting depth that can be achieved with the saw.

  4. Kerf: The kerf refers to the width of the slot or cut made by the blade. Wood cutting blades have different kerf sizes, which impact the amount of material wasted during the cutting process. Blades with a thinner kerf generate less waste but may have reduced durability.

  5. Hook Angle: The hook angle refers to the angle at which the teeth of the blade are tilted. Positive hook angles, such as 10 to 20 degrees, are commonly used for ripping applications, while negative or zero hook angles are suitable for crosscutting tasks. The hook angle affects the aggressiveness of the blade and the ease of feed during cutting.

  6. Carbide Tips: Many wood cutting blades feature carbide tips, which are durable and stay sharper for longer periods compared to regular steel blades. Carbide-tipped blades are particularly effective when cutting hardwoods or abrasive materials.

  7. Coating: Some wood cutting blades may feature specialized coatings, such as Teflon or similar non-stick coatings. These coatings reduce friction, improve cutting efficiency, and prevent material buildup on the blade.

  8. Arbor Size: Wood cutting blades have a central hole called the arbor hole, which fits onto the arbor (shaft) of the saw. The arbor size varies, typically ranging from 5/8 inch (15.9 mm) to 1 inch (25.4 mm). It is important to ensure that the blade's arbor size matches the arbor size of the saw for proper fit and safe operation.

  9. RPM (Revolutions Per Minute): Each wood cutting blade has a recommended maximum RPM specified by the manufacturer. It is crucial to ensure that the blade's RPM rating matches or exceeds the maximum RPM of the saw to prevent damage or accidents.

  10. Application: Wood cutting blades are used for a wide range of woodworking applications, including crosscutting, ripping, miter cuts, bevel cuts, and specialty tasks such as dado cutting or molding. They are used in various woodworking projects, including furniture making, cabinetry, carpentry, and general woodworking tasks.

It's important to note that specific wood cutting blades may have additional features or variations based on the manufacturer, blade type, and intended application. Always refer to the manufacturer's guidelines and recommendations for the specific blade you are using to ensure proper usage, safety, and optimal

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  • 40 Inch Wood Cutting Blade
  • 40 Inch Wood Cutting Blade
  • 40 Inch Wood Cutting Blade
40 Inch Wood Cutting Blade

40 Inch Wood Cutting Blade

Rs 11,000  / PieceGet Best Price
Size (Diameter)14 Inch
MaterialMild Steel
ApplicationWood Cutting
UsageFor Cross Cutting
Number of Teeth32
ShapeCircular

Wood cutting blades are specifically designed cutting tools used for various woodworking applications. These blades are used with different types of saws, such as circular saws, table saws, miter saws, or jigsaws, to cut through wood efficiently. Here is a description of wood cutting blades and their specifications:

  1. Blade Type: Wood cutting blades come in various types depending on the cutting application and the type of saw being used. Common types include rip-cut blades, crosscut blades, combination blades (for both ripping and crosscutting), dado blades (for making grooves), and specialty blades for specific woodworking tasks.

  2. Tooth Design: Wood cutting blades have teeth along the edge that perform the cutting action. The tooth design can vary based on the cutting task. Rip-cut blades typically have fewer teeth with a large gullet for efficient material removal when cutting with the grain. Crosscut blades have more teeth for cleaner cuts across the grain. Alternate top bevel (ATB) tooth configuration is commonly used for general-purpose wood cutting, while other specialized tooth designs may include flat top grind (FTG), triple-chip grind (TCG), or combination teeth.

  3. Blade Diameter: Wood cutting blades are available in different diameters, typically ranging from 4 to 12 inches (10.2 to 30.5 cm) or larger. The blade diameter determines the maximum cutting depth that can be achieved with the saw.

  4. Kerf: The kerf refers to the width of the slot or cut made by the blade. Wood cutting blades have different kerf sizes, which impact the amount of material wasted during the cutting process. Blades with a thinner kerf generate less waste but may have reduced durability.

  5. Hook Angle: The hook angle refers to the angle at which the teeth of the blade are tilted. Positive hook angles, such as 10 to 20 degrees, are commonly used for ripping applications, while negative or zero hook angles are suitable for crosscutting tasks. The hook angle affects the aggressiveness of the blade and the ease of feed during cutting.

  6. Carbide Tips: Many wood cutting blades feature carbide tips, which are durable and stay sharper for longer periods compared to regular steel blades. Carbide-tipped blades are particularly effective when cutting hardwoods or abrasive materials.

  7. Coating: Some wood cutting blades may feature specialized coatings, such as Teflon or similar non-stick coatings. These coatings reduce friction, improve cutting efficiency, and prevent material buildup on the blade.

  8. Arbor Size: Wood cutting blades have a central hole called the arbor hole, which fits onto the arbor (shaft) of the saw. The arbor size varies, typically ranging from 5/8 inch (15.9 mm) to 1 inch (25.4 mm). It is important to ensure that the blade's arbor size matches the arbor size of the saw for proper fit and safe operation.

  9. RPM (Revolutions Per Minute): Each wood cutting blade has a recommended maximum RPM specified by the manufacturer. It is crucial to ensure that the blade's RPM rating matches or exceeds the maximum RPM of the saw to prevent damage or accidents.

  10. Application: Wood cutting blades are used for a wide range of woodworking applications, including crosscutting, ripping, miter cuts, bevel cuts, and specialty tasks such as dado cutting or molding. They are used in various woodworking projects, including furniture making, cabinetry, carpentry, and general woodworking tasks.

It's important to note that specific wood cutting blades may have additional features or variations based on the manufacturer, blade type, and intended application. Always refer to the manufacturer's guidelines and recommendations for the specific blade you are using to ensure proper usage, safety, and optimal

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  • 24 Inch Wood Cutting Blade
  • 24 Inch Wood Cutting Blade
  • 24 Inch Wood Cutting Blade
  • 24 Inch Wood Cutting Blade
24 Inch Wood Cutting Blade

24 Inch Wood Cutting Blade

Rs 3,200  / PieceGet Best Price
Size (Diameter)14 Inch
MaterialMild Steel
ApplicationWood Cutting
UsageFor Ripping
ShapeCircular
teeth100,120

Wood cutting blades are specifically designed cutting tools used for various woodworking applications. These blades are used with different types of saws, such as circular saws, table saws, miter saws, or jigsaws, to cut through wood efficiently. Here is a description of wood cutting blades and their specifications:

  1. Blade Type: Wood cutting blades come in various types depending on the cutting application and the type of saw being used. Common types include rip-cut blades, crosscut blades, combination blades (for both ripping and crosscutting), dado blades (for making grooves), and specialty blades for specific woodworking tasks.

  2. Tooth Design: Wood cutting blades have teeth along the edge that perform the cutting action. The tooth design can vary based on the cutting task. Rip-cut blades typically have fewer teeth with a large gullet for efficient material removal when cutting with the grain. Crosscut blades have more teeth for cleaner cuts across the grain. Alternate top bevel (ATB) tooth configuration is commonly used for general-purpose wood cutting, while other specialized tooth designs may include flat top grind (FTG), triple-chip grind (TCG), or combination teeth.

  3. Blade Diameter: Wood cutting blades are available in different diameters, typically ranging from 4 to 12 inches (10.2 to 30.5 cm) or larger. The blade diameter determines the maximum cutting depth that can be achieved with the saw.

  4. Kerf: The kerf refers to the width of the slot or cut made by the blade. Wood cutting blades have different kerf sizes, which impact the amount of material wasted during the cutting process. Blades with a thinner kerf generate less waste but may have reduced durability.

  5. Hook Angle: The hook angle refers to the angle at which the teeth of the blade are tilted. Positive hook angles, such as 10 to 20 degrees, are commonly used for ripping applications, while negative or zero hook angles are suitable for crosscutting tasks. The hook angle affects the aggressiveness of the blade and the ease of feed during cutting.

  6. Carbide Tips: Many wood cutting blades feature carbide tips, which are durable and stay sharper for longer periods compared to regular steel blades. Carbide-tipped blades are particularly effective when cutting hardwoods or abrasive materials.

  7. Coating: Some wood cutting blades may feature specialized coatings, such as Teflon or similar non-stick coatings. These coatings reduce friction, improve cutting efficiency, and prevent material buildup on the blade.

  8. Arbor Size: Wood cutting blades have a central hole called the arbor hole, which fits onto the arbor (shaft) of the saw. The arbor size varies, typically ranging from 5/8 inch (15.9 mm) to 1 inch (25.4 mm). It is important to ensure that the blade's arbor size matches the arbor size of the saw for proper fit and safe operation.

  9. RPM (Revolutions Per Minute): Each wood cutting blade has a recommended maximum RPM specified by the manufacturer. It is crucial to ensure that the blade's RPM rating matches or exceeds the maximum RPM of the saw to prevent damage or accidents.

  10. Application: Wood cutting blades are used for a wide range of woodworking applications, including crosscutting, ripping, miter cuts, bevel cuts, and specialty tasks such as dado cutting or molding. They are used in various woodworking projects, including furniture making, cabinetry, carpentry, and general woodworking tasks.

It's important to note that specific wood cutting blades may have additional features or variations based on the manufacturer, blade type, and intended application. Always refer to the manufacturer's guidelines and recommendations for the specific blade you are using to ensure proper usage, safety, and optimal

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  • 36 Inch Wood Cutting Blade
  • 36 Inch Wood Cutting Blade
  • 36 Inch Wood Cutting Blade
36 Inch Wood Cutting Blade

36 Inch Wood Cutting Blade

Rs 9,800  / PieceGet Best Price
Size (Diameter)14 Inch
MaterialMild Steel
ApplicationWood Cutting
UsageFor Cross Cutting
Number of Teeth28
ShapeCircular

Wood cutting blades are specifically designed cutting tools used for various woodworking applications. These blades are used with different types of saws, such as circular saws, table saws, miter saws, or jigsaws, to cut through wood efficiently. Here is a description of wood cutting blades and their specifications:

  1. Blade Type: Wood cutting blades come in various types depending on the cutting application and the type of saw being used. Common types include rip-cut blades, crosscut blades, combination blades (for both ripping and crosscutting), dado blades (for making grooves), and specialty blades for specific woodworking tasks.

  2. Tooth Design: Wood cutting blades have teeth along the edge that perform the cutting action. The tooth design can vary based on the cutting task. Rip-cut blades typically have fewer teeth with a large gullet for efficient material removal when cutting with the grain. Crosscut blades have more teeth for cleaner cuts across the grain. Alternate top bevel (ATB) tooth configuration is commonly used for general-purpose wood cutting, while other specialized tooth designs may include flat top grind (FTG), triple-chip grind (TCG), or combination teeth.

  3. Blade Diameter: Wood cutting blades are available in different diameters, typically ranging from 4 to 12 inches (10.2 to 30.5 cm) or larger. The blade diameter determines the maximum cutting depth that can be achieved with the saw.

  4. Kerf: The kerf refers to the width of the slot or cut made by the blade. Wood cutting blades have different kerf sizes, which impact the amount of material wasted during the cutting process. Blades with a thinner kerf generate less waste but may have reduced durability.

  5. Hook Angle: The hook angle refers to the angle at which the teeth of the blade are tilted. Positive hook angles, such as 10 to 20 degrees, are commonly used for ripping applications, while negative or zero hook angles are suitable for crosscutting tasks. The hook angle affects the aggressiveness of the blade and the ease of feed during cutting.

  6. Carbide Tips: Many wood cutting blades feature carbide tips, which are durable and stay sharper for longer periods compared to regular steel blades. Carbide-tipped blades are particularly effective when cutting hardwoods or abrasive materials.

  7. Coating: Some wood cutting blades may feature specialized coatings, such as Teflon or similar non-stick coatings. These coatings reduce friction, improve cutting efficiency, and prevent material buildup on the blade.

  8. Arbor Size: Wood cutting blades have a central hole called the arbor hole, which fits onto the arbor (shaft) of the saw. The arbor size varies, typically ranging from 5/8 inch (15.9 mm) to 1 inch (25.4 mm). It is important to ensure that the blade's arbor size matches the arbor size of the saw for proper fit and safe operation.

  9. RPM (Revolutions Per Minute): Each wood cutting blade has a recommended maximum RPM specified by the manufacturer. It is crucial to ensure that the blade's RPM rating matches or exceeds the maximum RPM of the saw to prevent damage or accidents.

  10. Application: Wood cutting blades are used for a wide range of woodworking applications, including crosscutting, ripping, miter cuts, bevel cuts, and specialty tasks such as dado cutting or molding. They are used in various woodworking projects, including furniture making, cabinetry, carpentry, and general woodworking tasks.

It's important to note that specific wood cutting blades may have additional features or variations based on the manufacturer, blade type, and intended application. Always refer to the manufacturer's guidelines and recommendations for the specific blade you are using to ensure proper usage, safety, and optimal

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  • 32 Inch Wood Cutting Blade
  • 32 Inch Wood Cutting Blade
  • 32 Inch Wood Cutting Blade
32 Inch Wood Cutting Blade

32 Inch Wood Cutting Blade

Rs 4,800  / PieceGet Best Price
Size (Diameter)14 Inch
MaterialMild Steel
ApplicationWood Cutting
UsageFor Ripping
Number of Teeth32
ShapeCircular

Wood cutting blades are specifically designed cutting tools used for various woodworking applications. These blades are used with different types of saws, such as circular saws, table saws, miter saws, or jigsaws, to cut through wood efficiently. Here is a description of wood cutting blades and their specifications:

  1. Blade Type: Wood cutting blades come in various types depending on the cutting application and the type of saw being used. Common types include rip-cut blades, crosscut blades, combination blades (for both ripping and crosscutting), dado blades (for making grooves), and specialty blades for specific woodworking tasks.

  2. Tooth Design: Wood cutting blades have teeth along the edge that perform the cutting action. The tooth design can vary based on the cutting task. Rip-cut blades typically have fewer teeth with a large gullet for efficient material removal when cutting with the grain. Crosscut blades have more teeth for cleaner cuts across the grain. Alternate top bevel (ATB) tooth configuration is commonly used for general-purpose wood cutting, while other specialized tooth designs may include flat top grind (FTG), triple-chip grind (TCG), or combination teeth.

  3. Blade Diameter: Wood cutting blades are available in different diameters, typically ranging from 4 to 12 inches (10.2 to 30.5 cm) or larger. The blade diameter determines the maximum cutting depth that can be achieved with the saw.

  4. Kerf: The kerf refers to the width of the slot or cut made by the blade. Wood cutting blades have different kerf sizes, which impact the amount of material wasted during the cutting process. Blades with a thinner kerf generate less waste but may have reduced durability.

  5. Hook Angle: The hook angle refers to the angle at which the teeth of the blade are tilted. Positive hook angles, such as 10 to 20 degrees, are commonly used for ripping applications, while negative or zero hook angles are suitable for crosscutting tasks. The hook angle affects the aggressiveness of the blade and the ease of feed during cutting.

  6. Carbide Tips: Many wood cutting blades feature carbide tips, which are durable and stay sharper for longer periods compared to regular steel blades. Carbide-tipped blades are particularly effective when cutting hardwoods or abrasive materials.

  7. Coating: Some wood cutting blades may feature specialized coatings, such as Teflon or similar non-stick coatings. These coatings reduce friction, improve cutting efficiency, and prevent material buildup on the blade.

  8. Arbor Size: Wood cutting blades have a central hole called the arbor hole, which fits onto the arbor (shaft) of the saw. The arbor size varies, typically ranging from 5/8 inch (15.9 mm) to 1 inch (25.4 mm). It is important to ensure that the blade's arbor size matches the arbor size of the saw for proper fit and safe operation.

  9. RPM (Revolutions Per Minute): Each wood cutting blade has a recommended maximum RPM specified by the manufacturer. It is crucial to ensure that the blade's RPM rating matches or exceeds the maximum RPM of the saw to prevent damage or accidents.

  10. Application: Wood cutting blades are used for a wide range of woodworking applications, including crosscutting, ripping, miter cuts, bevel cuts, and specialty tasks such as dado cutting or molding. They are used in various woodworking projects, including furniture making, cabinetry, carpentry, and general woodworking tasks.

It's important to note that specific wood cutting blades may have additional features or variations based on the manufacturer, blade type, and intended application. Always refer to the manufacturer's guidelines and recommendations for the specific blade you are using to ensure proper usage, safety, and optimal

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  • 30 Inch Wood Cutting Blade
  • 30 Inch Wood Cutting Blade
  • 30 Inch Wood Cutting Blade
30 Inch Wood Cutting Blade

30 Inch Wood Cutting Blade

Rs 5,500  / PieceGet Best Price
Size (Diameter)14 Inch
ApplicationWood Cutting
MaterialMild Steel
UsageFor Ripping
Number of Teeth32
ShapeCircular

Wood cutting blades are specifically designed cutting tools used for various woodworking applications. These blades are used with different types of saws, such as circular saws, table saws, miter saws, or jigsaws, to cut through wood efficiently. Here is a description of wood cutting blades and their specifications:

  1. Blade Type: Wood cutting blades come in various types depending on the cutting application and the type of saw being used. Common types include rip-cut blades, crosscut blades, combination blades (for both ripping and crosscutting), dado blades (for making grooves), and specialty blades for specific woodworking tasks.

  2. Tooth Design: Wood cutting blades have teeth along the edge that perform the cutting action. The tooth design can vary based on the cutting task. Rip-cut blades typically have fewer teeth with a large gullet for efficient material removal when cutting with the grain. Crosscut blades have more teeth for cleaner cuts across the grain. Alternate top bevel (ATB) tooth configuration is commonly used for general-purpose wood cutting, while other specialized tooth designs may include flat top grind (FTG), triple-chip grind (TCG), or combination teeth.

  3. Blade Diameter: Wood cutting blades are available in different diameters, typically ranging from 4 to 12 inches (10.2 to 30.5 cm) or larger. The blade diameter determines the maximum cutting depth that can be achieved with the saw.

  4. Kerf: The kerf refers to the width of the slot or cut made by the blade. Wood cutting blades have different kerf sizes, which impact the amount of material wasted during the cutting process. Blades with a thinner kerf generate less waste but may have reduced durability.

  5. Hook Angle: The hook angle refers to the angle at which the teeth of the blade are tilted. Positive hook angles, such as 10 to 20 degrees, are commonly used for ripping applications, while negative or zero hook angles are suitable for crosscutting tasks. The hook angle affects the aggressiveness of the blade and the ease of feed during cutting.

  6. Carbide Tips: Many wood cutting blades feature carbide tips, which are durable and stay sharper for longer periods compared to regular steel blades. Carbide-tipped blades are particularly effective when cutting hardwoods or abrasive materials.

  7. Coating: Some wood cutting blades may feature specialized coatings, such as Teflon or similar non-stick coatings. These coatings reduce friction, improve cutting efficiency, and prevent material buildup on the blade.

  8. Arbor Size: Wood cutting blades have a central hole called the arbor hole, which fits onto the arbor (shaft) of the saw. The arbor size varies, typically ranging from 5/8 inch (15.9 mm) to 1 inch (25.4 mm). It is important to ensure that the blade's arbor size matches the arbor size of the saw for proper fit and safe operation.

  9. RPM (Revolutions Per Minute): Each wood cutting blade has a recommended maximum RPM specified by the manufacturer. It is crucial to ensure that the blade's RPM rating matches or exceeds the maximum RPM of the saw to prevent damage or accidents.

  10. Application: Wood cutting blades are used for a wide range of woodworking applications, including crosscutting, ripping, miter cuts, bevel cuts, and specialty tasks such as dado cutting or molding. They are used in various woodworking projects, including furniture making, cabinetry, carpentry, and general woodworking tasks.

It's important to note that specific wood cutting blades may have additional features or variations based on the manufacturer, blade type, and intended application. Always refer to the manufacturer's guidelines and recommendations for the specific blade you are using to ensure proper usage, safety, and optimal

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  • 30 inch circular saw Blade
  • 30 inch circular saw Blade
  • 30 inch circular saw Blade
  • 30 inch circular saw Blade
  • 30 inch circular saw Blade
30 inch circular saw Blade

30 inch circular saw Blade

Rs 1,300  / PieceGet Best Price
Size (Diameter)>14 Inch
ApplicationWood Cutting
ShapeCircular
MaterialMild Steel
Country of OriginMade in India

A circular saw blade is a cutting tool specifically designed for use with a circular saw, which is a power tool commonly used in woodworking, construction, and other industries. Circular saw blades come in various types and sizes to accommodate different cutting applications. Here is a description of a typical circular saw blade and its specifications:

  1. Material: Circular saw blades are made from different types of materials, depending on the cutting application. Common materials include high-speed steel (HSS), carbide-tipped (CT) or tungsten carbide (WC) blades, and diamond-tipped blades for cutting hard materials like concrete or masonry.

  2. Tooth Design: Circular saw blades feature a series of teeth along the edge that make the actual cutting. The tooth design can vary, including rip-cut or crosscut teeth. Rip-cut teeth have larger gullets and fewer teeth per inch, making them suitable for cutting with the grain of the material. Crosscut teeth have smaller gullets and more teeth per inch, providing smoother cuts across the grain.

  3. Diameter: The diameter of circular saw blades can range from 4 to 12 inches (10.2 to 30.5 cm) or even larger, depending on the saw and its intended use. The blade diameter determines the maximum depth of cut achievable with the saw.

  4. Arbor Size: Circular saw blades have a central hole called the arbor hole, which fits onto the arbor (shaft) of the circular saw. The arbor size varies, typically ranging from 5/8 inch (15.9 mm) to 1 inch (25.4 mm). It is essential to ensure that the blade's arbor size matches the arbor size of the circular saw for proper fit and safe operation.

  5. Kerf: The kerf refers to the thickness of the slot or cut made by the blade. It is an important specification to consider, as it affects the amount of material wasted during the cutting process. Blades with a thinner kerf tend to generate less waste but may be less durable.

  6. Coating: Some circular saw blades may have special coatings, such as anti-friction or anti-corrosion coatings, to enhance performance and durability. These coatings reduce heat buildup, friction, and protect against rust and corrosion.

  7. Application: Circular saw blades are versatile and used for various cutting tasks, including crosscutting, ripping, miter cutting, bevel cutting, and even specialized applications like cutting laminate flooring, metal, or concrete, depending on the blade type and design.

  8. RPM (Revolutions Per Minute): Each circular saw blade has a recommended maximum RPM specified by the manufacturer. It is crucial to ensure that the blade's RPM rating matches or exceeds the maximum RPM of the circular saw to prevent damage or accidents.

  9. Safety Features: Some circular saw blades may include safety features such as vibration dampening slots or laser-cut expansion slots to reduce noise, vibration, and heat buildup during cutting, improving user comfort and safety.

It's important to note that specific circular saw blades may have additional features or variations based on the manufacturer, blade type, and intended application. Always refer to the manufacturer's guidelines and recommendations for the specific blade you are using to ensure proper usage, safety, and optimal cutting performance.

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  • Wood Cutting Blade
  • Wood Cutting Blade
  • Wood Cutting Blade
  • Wood Cutting Blade
Wood Cutting Blade

Wood Cutting Blade

Rs 400  / PieceGet Best Price

Minimum Order Quantity: 5 Piece

MaterialStainless Steel
ApplicationWood Cutting
UsageFor Cross-Cutting
Number of Teeth60
ShapeCircular
Dimension30 inch-40 inch

Looking for the perfect wood cutting blade to tackle your next woodworking project? Look no further than our selection of high-quality wood cutting blades!

Our wood cutting blades are crafted from the finest materials to provide long-lasting durability and superior performance. Whether you're a professional woodworker or a DIY enthusiast, our blades are designed to meet the demands of even the most challenging woodworking tasks.

With a wide range of blade types, tooth counts, and sizes to choose from, we have the perfect blade to suit your needs. Our selection includes crosscut blades, rip blades, combination blades, and more, ensuring that you can find the ideal blade for any cutting task.

Our wood cutting blades are designed to provide smooth, accurate cuts every time, so you can achieve perfect results with minimal effort. Plus, our blades are easy to install and maintain, so you can spend less time fussing with your tools and more time creating beautiful woodworking projects.

So why settle for subpar wood cutting blades that can't deliver the performance you need? Upgrade your woodworking game with our top-quality wood cutting blades and experience the difference for yourself. Shop now and see the results for yourself!

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  • Arra Blade
  • Arra Blade
  • Arra Blade
Arra Blade

Arra Blade

Rs 1,300  / PieceGet Best Price
Size (Diameter)10 Inch
MaterialStainless Steel
ApplicationWood Cutting
UsageFor Cross Cutting
ShapeCircular
Thickness1.5-10.5mm

A wood cutting ripping blade is a specialized tool designed for making rip cuts in wood. Rip cuts are straight cuts made parallel to the wood grain, typically used for cutting boards to width or ripping large panels. Here is a description of a wood cutting ripping blade and its specifications:

  1. Blade Type: Wood cutting ripping blades are typically circular saw blades designed specifically for ripping cuts. They have a specific tooth geometry and configuration optimized for efficient material removal during rip cuts.

  2. Tooth Design: Ripping blades have large, flat-top teeth with deep gullets between them. The flat-top teeth are typically arranged in a flat-top or alternate top bevel (ATB) configuration. This tooth design helps to efficiently remove wood chips and sawdust from the cut, reducing heat buildup and preventing blade binding.

  3. Tooth Count: Ripping blades usually have a low tooth count, typically ranging from 20 to 30 teeth. The low tooth count allows for faster material removal and reduces strain on the motor, making them suitable for ripping through thick wood stock.

  4. Hook Angle: Ripping blades have a positive hook angle, typically ranging from 10 to 20 degrees. The positive hook angle helps the blade to aggressively bite into the wood and facilitate smooth and efficient cutting.

  5. Blade Diameter: Wood cutting ripping blades come in different diameters, typically ranging from 7-1/4 inches (18.4 cm) to 10 inches (25.4 cm) or larger. The blade diameter determines the maximum cutting depth that can be achieved.

  6. Arbor Size: Ripping blades have a central hole called the arbor hole, which fits onto the arbor (shaft) of the circular saw or table saw. The arbor size varies, typically ranging from 5/8 inch (15.9 mm) to 1 inch (25.4 mm). It is important to ensure that the blade's arbor size matches the arbor size of the saw for proper fit and safe operation.

  7. Blade Coating: Some ripping blades may have a special coating, such as a non-stick coating or anti-friction coating. These coatings reduce friction and heat buildup during cutting, resulting in smoother cuts and longer blade life.

  8. Application: Wood cutting ripping blades are primarily used for making rip cuts in solid wood, plywood, and other wood materials. They are commonly used in woodworking projects, carpentry, cabinetry, and furniture making.

It's important to note that the specific features and specifications of wood cutting ripping blades can vary depending on the manufacturer, blade type, and intended application. It is recommended to consult the manufacturer's guidelines and recommendations for the specific blade you are using to ensure proper usage, safety, and optimal cutting performance for wood materials.

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